Colombia State University: Unravelling the Mediterranean Migration ‘Crisis’

Colombia State University: Unravelling the Mediterranean Migration ‘Crisis’

At Colombia State University, USA, Professor Heaven Crawley reported on the preliminary findings of the MEDMIG project and considered some of the reasons why so many people embarked upon the dangerous journey to Europe in 2015, what happened to them on the way and what hopes they held for the future. She ended reflecting on the reasons why the European policy response has led to a humanitarian and political crisis which threatens not only the lives of refugees and migrants but also the future of the European Union itself.

More information about the event can be found here.

Unravelling the Mediterranean Migration Crisis, Georgetown University

Unravelling the Mediterranean Migration Crisis, Georgetown University

This public lecture took place at the Institute for the Study of International Migration (ISIM), Georgetown University, 19th April. Professor Heaven Crawley reported on the preliminary findings of an ESRC funded research project being led by Coventry University’s Center for Trust, Peace and Social Relations in partnership with the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham currently being undertaken in Malta, Italy, Greece and Turkey exploring the experiences of migrants crossing the Mediterranean. The lecture explored some of the reasons why they embarked upon the dangerous journey to Europe, what happened to them on the way an their homes for the future. Around 50 people attended the event, a mixture of undergraduate and postgraduate students, academics and some practitioners.

Further details about the event can be viewed here.

Migration Policy Institute, Washington DC

Migration Policy Institute, Washington DC

Professor Heaven Crawley attended this roundtable discussion held 18th April along with a selection of invited researchers and policy analysts to the Migration Policy Institute (MPI). MPI is directly engaged in advising policy makers and politicians on their responses to the European migration crisis including through their role in leading the Transatlantic Council on Migration. Members of the MPI Brussels office also joined the discussion remotely.

Further information can be found here.

Harvard European Law Association: Unravelling the European Migration ‘Crisis’

Harvard European Law Association: Unravelling the European Migration ‘Crisis’

Professor Heaven Crawley was one of the panellists at the seminar organised by the Harvard European Law Association (HELA) 13th April 2016, discussing the European migration ‘crisis’ from a legal perspective.

Europe is facing an unprecedented challenge. More than a million migrants and refugees crossed into Europe in 2015, and continue to do so in 2016, sparking a crisis as countries struggled to cope with the influx, and creating political tension and division in the EU over how best to deal with resettling people. Continue reading

21st Century Challenges – Europe’s Migration Crisis?

21st Century Challenges – Europe’s Migration Crisis?

On 22nd March Professor Heaven Crawley appeared alongside David Walker (Guardian Public), Madeline Sumption (Migration Observatory), Dr Max Nathan (Birmingham University) and Professor Christina Boswell (Edinburgh University) at a policy forum organised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) to explore the issue of migration in Europe. Professor Crawley was asked to reflect on what Geography might have to offer our understanding of international migration. You can hear what she had to say here. Continue reading

Roundtable: Unravelling the Mediterranean migration ‘crisis’

Roundtable: Unravelling the Mediterranean migration ‘crisis’

The policy roundtable held at Oxford University Wednesday 16th March saw nearly 40 policy makers come together from international organisations and NGOs with an interest in the current migration ‘crisis’. Professor Heaven CrawleyDr Nando Sigona and Dr Franck Duvell were among the key speakers. The event provided an opportunity to present the findings of the MEDMIG research on the causes of the Mediterranean migration ‘crisis’, the implications of migration dynamics and flows for the UK, and to share ideas and opinions on potential policy responses including in relation to the resettlement of refugees and other migrants arriving in the countries of southern Europe or currently located in the neighbouring countries (Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon). These discussions will inform the final research brief which will be published Tuesday 22nd March and explored further at a policy forum organised by the Royal Geographical Society.

Seminar The Refugee Crisis: Risks, Fears and Security in Europe

On 27th January 2016 Professor Heaven Crawley attended The Refugee Crisis: risks, fears and security in Europe seminar which was held at the Utrecht Centre for Regulation and Enforcement in Europe (RENFORCE), Utrecht University. Heaven was one of the keynote speakers sharing her experiences of the migration situation in the UK. The expert meeting aimed to discuss issues around historical experiences of migration; how receiving countries deal with the “refugee crisis”; the role of data and empirical research in understanding migration flows; “best practices” in policy regarding migration to the EU; and shortcomings of European legal regulations in terms of admission of refugees to the EU.

The full programme and list of speakers can be viewed here.

Unravelling the Mediterranean migration crisis: reflections from the field

Unravelling the Mediterranean migration crisis: reflections from the field

On 21st January 2016, Professor Heaven Crawley gave a talk as part of the COMPAS (Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society) Hilary Term 2016 seminar series titled ‘Open the Way: Understanding the Refugee Crisis‘ at University of Oxford. The seminar series was convened by MEDMIG Co-Investigator Dr Franck Duvell and explores the dynamics of migration, the relationship between EU and Turkey and responses from civil society actors. The seminar featuring Heaven was recorded and can be heard here.